asker

the-old-folk-blues asked: Sorry if I was unclear. I remember a while back you were considering your dream-team American Gods (one of my favourite books) cast, and you made a point of wanting the right ethnicity for Shadow. Which I found weird because I spent most of the book thinking of Shadow as a white guy until the "coffee-and-cream"(?) offhand description towards the end. So, thought I, if Shadow's ethnicity is so unimportant to be "revealed" towards the end of the book, then why does the actor’s ethnicity matter? 1.

With the greatest respect, that might say more about how you read the book than it does about the book you thought you read. Take a look at American Gods again and let me know what you find…

asker

the-old-folk-blues asked: Why is it that the ethnicity of your characters is so important to visual adaptions when you rarely, if ever, mention it in your prose?

muchymozzarella:

neil-gaiman:

I don’t really understand the question. If the ethnicity of the characters wasn’t in the prose it wouldn’t be mentioned at all in the adaptations and nobody would care. If you are paying attention you will find all sorts of people in the books, with all sorts of backgrounds. 

And it probably came from comics, in which I could have someone drawn as being part of a particular race or ethnicity and then not have to have them talk about being part of that ethnicity, but simply get on with the business of being in the story and behaving as that person, with that point of view, which would include ethnicity, would behave.

It’s important because representation

And also because I was stupid enough to think Fat Charlie was white for the entirety of Anansi Boys until in hindsight I realized what having Anansi for a dad would obviously mean 

Neil may not always say explicitly what the characters’ ethnicities are but he implies them enough, and if you’re paying attention, you’ll be able to figure it out. 

And maybe this is difficult to understand but as someone who’s grown up a bibliophile, who was so bombarded by white characters that I default to Caucasian in my head even when the character is decidedly nonwhite, it’s important to shake off those years of idiotic Western/Caucasian-centricity by portraying characters as other ethnicities.

Exactly.

asker

caseythegreat asked: I like to know the names of things. Would you happen to know the name for the type of stories in which multiple characters take turns telling stories? I enjoy the format. "Worlds' End" and "October In The Chair" are two of my favorites, along with Clarke's "Tales From The White Hart." The format seems to date at least as far back as Chaucer, but I can't seem to find the actual terminology for this style of storytelling. Do you know what it is called?

It tends to be referred to as a “Club story”. If you read the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction article at http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/club_story it will tell you everything you want to know and lots of things you didn’t know you wanted to know, in a long article by John Clute.

asker

thedoctorsdoctor asked: Dear Mr. Gaiman, I've written my first novel and I've had no success finding a literary agent to represent me. It's always "liked, not loved" or "just not for me". I'm considering self publishing but for someone with nothing more than a part time job and not much in the way of savings, it's quite the investment. I guess what I'm asking is, in the long run, is being a writer worth it? i know you found success in the medium, but I'm terrified. Is the risk worth the reward?

I wouldn’t EVER self-publish in the sense of paying someone to print books. But self-publishing through Amazon or similar as an ebook is a cheap and easy thing to do, and will get it read.

asker

the-old-folk-blues asked: Why is it that the ethnicity of your characters is so important to visual adaptions when you rarely, if ever, mention it in your prose?

I don’t really understand the question. If the ethnicity of the characters wasn’t in the prose it wouldn’t be mentioned at all in the adaptations and nobody would care. If you are paying attention you will find all sorts of people in the books, with all sorts of backgrounds. 

And it probably came from comics, in which I could have someone drawn as being part of a particular race or ethnicity and then not have to have them talk about being part of that ethnicity, but simply get on with the business of being in the story and behaving as that person, with that point of view, which would include ethnicity, would behave.

…and if you are wondering why Amanda would write a book about asking, this is why.

Amanda’s book cover.

It’s a remarkable book. It’s partly a memoir, partly an extended meditation and guide to asking for help in life and on the internet, and, which came as a bit of a surprise, there’s an awful lot about me and our marriage in there too.

Lots of ordering information at http://amandapalmer.net/ and NSFW blog with pictures of the cover body painting at http://amandapalmer.net/blog/20140820/

Amanda’s book cover.

It’s a remarkable book. It’s partly a memoir, partly an extended meditation and guide to asking for help in life and on the internet, and, which came as a bit of a surprise, there’s an awful lot about me and our marriage in there too.

Lots of ordering information at http://amandapalmer.net/ and NSFW blog with pictures of the cover body painting at http://amandapalmer.net/blog/20140820/

They now have LOTS of signed OCEANs at the Hudson Booksellers by gate 32 in JFK terminal 4…View more Neil Gaiman on WhoSay

They now have LOTS of signed OCEANs at the Hudson Booksellers by gate 32 in JFK terminal 4…

View more Neil Gaiman on WhoSay

(via upworthy)