end0skeletal:

Happy Owls!

(via mydrunkkitchen)

There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. — Somerset Maugham (via ellenkushner)

(via ellenkushner)

explore-blog:

For Nikola Tesla's birthday, a wonderful read on how anarchy and serendipity fuel science

explore-blog:

For Nikola Tesla's birthday, a wonderful read on how anarchy and serendipity fuel science

(via amandapalmer)

Ominous screen shots…

Ominous screen shots…

asker

theimaginatrix27 asked: Hello, Neil. I'm blind and have yet to read any of your books aside from "Coraline", which I got through Vision Australia's library on cassette when I was sixteen. However, I have seen the film version of "Stardust" and fell in love with it. Unfortunately, as near as I can tell, the book hasn't been produced in an audio format. At least, Audible doesn't have it. If there's anything at all you can do to change this so I can listen to the book version, I would be extremely grateful.

There are lots of audiobooks of my work, and audible should have them all. Not quite sure how to fix this for you… I read most of them, including Stardust.

asker

honeybadgertactics asked: Hello Mr. Gaiman. I don't know if you'll have any say in casting for American Gods, but I think it would be FANTASTIC if the characters were not white-washed as so many tend to be. Books, movies, and shows have always been a wonderful solace from all the horrible things in my life and the world around me, but it never ceases to amaze me and hurt me deeply when there are no people like me playing complex and interesting characters. Just wanted to express my thoughts and feelings to someone.

I agree. With American Gods (and with Anansi Boys) I’ve told the producers that I want the characters cast as they are in the book.

When we made Neverwhere with the BBC, we did colour-blind casting, which meant that we auditioned without regard to race, and gave the roles to the best people at the auditions. The Marquis and Hunter weren’t black in the original scripts, nor were Richard and Door white. (Richard wasn’t even Scottish.) It was a great way of casting. And that was 1996, and even then it only happened because we made it with Crucial Films, Lenny Henry’s company, and that was Crucial’s philosophy. I wish it occurred more.

(Having said that, the Black Friars were always all black.)

asker

filialunaris asked: Hiya Neil. I just started writing a book and I'm stuck on a particular scene. It's not that I don't know what happens next, it's that I've just mulled over it for so long that I'm starting to go a bit brain-numb. Does this ever happen to you? Do you have any suggestions? I don't want to lose my motivation.

Write a different scene, and go back to it later.

asker

everyday-ephemera asked: Have you ever felt ashamed for the way that you express yourself? Every time I speak using a somewhat educated (whatever that means) vocabulary all I get are eye rolls and groans. Even members of my own family have expressed their annoyance (I was once told to "get rid of my intellectual side"). I'm not trying to talk down to anyone, but it is frustrating. I know everyone isn't at the same reading/vocabulary level, but I wish people approached unfamiliar words with curiosity rather than scorn.

Me too. Although if I realise I’m using words that people don’t understand while talking, I’ll define them. The point of talking is communication, and if you are using words people don’t understand, you aren’t communicating. (I’m happier to use whatever words I wish in writing, because people have dictionaries and computers.)

asker

fouroffivewits asked: Is part of the reason the deal with HBO fell through with American Gods because they wanted a more clear explanation of the magic such as you commented on your review for A Winter's Tale?

Not exactly. They just wanted everything — the characters, the big story, the background — spelled out in the first 50 minutes, and I prefer to think of it as a journey of discovery.